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Saturday, July 24, 2010

Gun Safety

The Brady Campaign will be glad to know the Nerf Maverick's trigger pull is too heavy for my 2 year old nephew to actually fire.  With a little bit of his uncle's help he did manage to get one shot to stick to the TV, so it wasn't a total loss.

Nice Pair

Although I do intend on picking up a GSG-1911 in the near future... but for now the P22 makes a decent match for the M&P15-22.

Huh... that was fast...

The one downside of having an M&P15-22 and a decent amount of mags is that a 333 round box of Winchester .22lr disappears awful fast.  I don't think I was at the range more than 45 minutes before my box was empty.

But, weapons qual coming up for Uncle Sam, so we'll turn around and do it all over again at the next chance. And again... and again...

Super-light SAW

Kit-up has three new posts talking about a new concept SAW style weapon that fires a telescopic lightweight 5.56 round (essentially a polymer case with the propellant surrounding the projectile.)  Removing the brass from the equation creates a pretty decent reduction in the overall weight of the ammo.

They're also talking about a traditional carbine setup using the system (possibly a modified M4.)  The shape and size of the round allow it to use a 40 round straight magazine (not curved like the standard AR/M16 mag) that is not much bigger than the current M16 mag.  The operating system also lets them squeeze a few more inches of barrel into the same overall length package, which is never a bad thing.

From what I understand, the tech has been around since the '70s, but it sounds like the Army is hoping to actually start seriously looking into it, with field tests slatted for next summer.